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15 Struggles Of A Young Professional In Montreal

The working life doesn't have it all.
15 Struggles Of A Young Professional In Montreal

You're out of school, you have some sort of office-ish job, and you're still in your 20s/30s. If that sounds like you, congratulations, you're a young professional in Montreal.

And it isn't easy.

Unlike the zero-stress and responsibilities of the student life, or the wealth of experience (and actual money) enjoyed by established professionals, all of us young-ish folks who have recently entered the workforce have a particularly struggle-filled life.

To all the young professionals reading who take all of life's hurdles like a boss, this one's for you. We feel your pain.

All of your friends work at restaurants.

Them: Yeah, lets go out! I don't work until noon tomorrow!

You: Guys, it's Tuesday...

The struggle of the 9 to 5 work week is more than real, it's hyper-real.

Waking up on Monday. Every time.

Yay, it's the weekend, lets party! Great, just now you're on an "up 'til 4am, wake up at 1pm" sleeping schedule. Needless to say, you get to bed real late on Sunday, making Mondays all the worse. No one gets a case of the Mondays like a Montreal young professional.

The constant dilemma: cheap & barely livable apartment VS luxurious & expensive?

Getting a dingy room in an apartment filled with randos may only cost you $350, but what about that amazing 3 1/2 in Old Montreal that goes for $950? Adult decisions are so hard.

The hate experienced when living next to students.

You used to be one of them, but now you can't help but get this hate-filled pit in your gut when you hear the students in your building getting "turnt" (as the kids say) on a Thursday. Maybe it's envy, maybe you just can't stand listening to Trap Queen for the 684035th time. Either way, hate is hate.

Wearing business-casual clothes during the winter.

Managing to look good at the office when there's 2 feet of snow and negative 30 winds in night impossible. All the ladies who wear heels in the winter, you know the struggle. I think you're crazy, but mad respect for rocking 4-inches with all that ice.

You're too old for a cheap monthly STM pass.

Gone are the days of the $40-ish pass for unlimited STM fares. Now you gotta fork out double the dough, and only because you're out of school. Sucks to suck, but it's even worse if you actually own a car, which brings us to...

Owning a car, and finding parking.

First off, if you actually bought a car on your own dollar, it's probably pretty crummy. But that's besides the main point. While all of your artsy hipster friends just walk or bike everywhere, every time you go out you're stuck with your behemoth (by comparison) of a car. Meaning you need to find parking, a struggle in itself.

Dealing with other (douchey) young professionals.

Lets face it, there are douchebags everywhere, but when a douche enters the young professional phase of their life, they seem to enter a zenith of douchiness. God only knows why (probably because they actually think they "matter" now that hey have an entry-level job at some company) but the reality is you'll have to deal with plenty of a-holes in your workplace.

Being hired solely to "handle social media."

Pretty much because the older generation doesn't know how to properly deal with "the Facebook," so many of us Millennials entering the workforce are shafted to the role of "social media manager." What that actually entails differs widely, and is usually nothing more than tweeting or posting out some bull, but hey, you're getting paid, so why not.

Crying at the taxes taken off of your paycheck.

Sure, you're contract may say $34k a year, but after the province takes its cut, well, you're left with a shockingly low amount left on your paycheck. That's the price you pay for living in good ol' Quebec.

Constantly fighting the urge to move to Toronto.

Higher salaries, less taxes, more job prospects, it's hard to ignore the many reasons a young professional in Montreal should move to the 6ix. But ignore them you will, because fuck that TO-life.

Making it seem like you care about the city's "issues."

Just because you got a big girl/boy job, people assume you automatically know what's going on with politics, infrastructure, and all that noise. Really, you're the same self-involved party-person you were before who cares next to nothing about the news, but you can't let your boss know that.

Actually finding a job in Montreal.

Add another layer of difficulty if you're an Anglophone. Either way, finding a well-payed position in the city that's actually in your desired field is a lot like catching a Mew in Pokemon. You know its out there, it's just hella rare.

5 à 7s. Every time.

The idea of post-work boozing sounds magical on paper, in practice, however, it never ends that well. Because you lack all self control (no judgment, we all do) the 3-drink minimum is cast off like a post-sex condom and you end up getting kinda hammered. Work the next morning is far from cute.

Looking super out of place in the Plateau.

When you walked out of your house looking all clean-cut and dapper, sporting a trendy blazer and classy (but not too classy) shoes, you thought you'd be turning heads down the street. And maybe you would in Old Montreal or Downtown, but when you head into the Plateau, where everyone dresses like they have nowhere important to go, you stick out and tend to turn heads in the not-so-great-way. Always be prepared and carry a change of hip-relaxed clothes on your person.