The allure of the Mile End has seen some ups and downs in the last couple of days. After being named the coolest neighbourhood in the world, a definite increase in prestige-points, the Mile End has been knocked down a few pegs in trendy-allure due to a conflict between borough leaders and bar/restaurant owners.

Basically, the administrative leaders of the Mile End are not letting nightlife establishments, both of the bar and restaurant variety, set up new terrasses on major streets like Bernard, Saint-Viateur, and Fairmount, reports Journal Métro.

This has put a damper on the summer-plans for several noteworthy Mile End establishments, including the ever-trendy L'Gros Luxe, pub Bishop & Bagg, and ritzy brunch spot B&M. All three have been denied the right to build terrasses on their respective streets.

So why have Mile End streets been deemed a "no-terrasse zone"? Mile End's city councillor Richard Ryan spoke to Métro, stating that the designated streets are simply too residential.

Unlike super-commercial streets like Saint Laurent, explains Ryan, there are a fair amount of houses along (and right off of) Mile End's commercial arteries, and since it's harder to control closing times and noise levels on a terrasse, tensions between residents and nightlife establishments could become a problem.

That's definitely a fair point on the Mile End administration's part, but it's kind of hard to deny a bar or restaurant the serious boon to their summer business gained through a terrasse simply because people might complain.

Coupled with the fact that the only places to set up a bar or restaurant in the Mile End are along Fairmount, Bernard, or Saint Viateur, each one a major commercial stretch, the outright ban on terrasses is a little intense.

Already-established terrasses won't be affected by the Mile End's sorta-ban, like Café Club Social's year-round outdoor area or Cafe Olimpico's. Neither will Ping Pong Club's, which is set up on Bernard and Saint Laurent street, though the bar complained of an increase of fines.

Montreal's public terrasses, otherwise known as a "placottoir," could come to the Mile End, however, which could fill some of the void left by having next to no terrasses along the neighbourhood's most popular streets. Still, having both would be far nicer.

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