• While it can be easy to make fun and hate on the STM, we honestly would be screwed in Montreal without them.
  • And, it's important to remember that most delays are caused by passengers.
  • Though according to the STM, delays have significantly dropped in the last year... take a look at the stats (and hilarious metro puns) provided by the STM below.

While an STM bus was making headlines last week, this week it's all about the metro.

Has it felt like the metro really has really had its shit together lately? Well, apparently, you weren't imagining things.

According to a new press release posted by the STM, there has been a whopping 17% decrease in metro stoppages related to passengers since this time last year.

Stoppages related to passengers include instances where passengers drop things on the tracks, hold open the doors, walk on the tracks or suffer sickness or injury that requires the train to be held up.

The STM keeps track of all these kinds of stops that cause a disruption of 5 minutes or more, and they have been able to confirm that there has been significant decreases in each of the aforementioned areas.

Not only is this great news for the STM, it means as commuters we're collectively getting better at not causing delays, meaning we spend less time waiting around for the train to actually get moving.

In fact, according to the STM, in the past year we've managed to decrease the cumulative disruption time by 6 hours or 353 minutes.

Nice.

The STM made the announcement this morning alongside these punny new signs that congratulate and encourage more of this positive passenger behaviour, while also playing on the names of several metro stations.

For those who are still brushing up on their French, the bolded words are what the stations are replacing to create the play on words.


Moins d'arrĂȘts de service, ça nous mets de bonne humeur!

Less downtime, it puts us in a good mood!


En diminuant les arrĂȘts de service, on ne manque plus un rendez-vous.

By decreasing the stops of service, one no longer misses an appointment.


On a bien rĂ©duit less arrĂȘts de service, mais ne dormons pas sur nos lauriers.

We have reduced the service stops, but do not sleep on our laurels.


Moins d'arrĂȘts de service, c'est plus de mĂ©tros qui arrivent pile Ă  l'heure.

Fewer stops, it's more subways arriving then on time.


Translations are my own, and honestly, that last one kind of had me stumped... did I get the joke? Or did I miss it completely? Let me know on Twitter @lvbs.

In terms of the reduction of disruptions, the STM provided these highly-laudable numbers to indicate the decrease in passenger-made disruptions.

Stops caused by injured or sick passengers are down 7% from this time last year.

Stops caused by passengers dropping things on the tracks are down by 17% from this time last year.

Stops caused by passengers holding back the doors are down by 36% from this time last year.

And stops caused by passengers walking on the tracks is down a whole 45% from fall 2018.


READ ALSO: This Montreal STM Bus Hits So Many Potholes That Some Women Claim It Turns Them On

 

STM

The pun above plays on "Namur" replacing "amour," which would then have the poster reading, "Fewer stops to service means more time with your love."

If you're a lover of Montreal's metro and enjoy some good wordplay en français, you can actually participate in a contest on the STM's Facebook page to come up with more metro station puns that work to encourage this positive passenger behaviour.

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