For several years, we’ve seen the rock and pop music world come through for various social causes and in support of disaster relief, such as Band-Aid and Farm-Aid or in regional events such as the Jersey Hurricane concert last year spearheaded by Bon Jovi.

And local cities have their events as well and last Thursday, June 27th, we had the pleasure to take in an intimate acoustic event at O Patro Vys on Mount Royal Avenue organized by the good people at Jam for Justice in support of Sisterhood of the Travelling Feet ( participants in this year’s Pharmaprix Weekend to end Women’s Cancers. The event was called Rock for the Cure.

The evening featured three of Montreal’s emerging female singers, who have been performing around town for several years now to growing audiences. Tricia Fitz, Brittany Kwasnik, and Stefanie Parnell were part of this event to help raise those needed funds.

After welcoming remarks by founder Sean Cohen, it was Tricia Fitz, who opened the show, and displayed an awesome set of pipes that caught everybody’s attention and hitting the highs without a strain. Being born in Brazil, and admitting to her Portuguese roots, and at times, one could catch some of those folkloric influences and some cute humor thrown in.

On her third song, she thanked the crowd for being attentive recalling a previous club gig where it was a loud beer drinking crowd where she couldn’t hear herself. She called that song Horrible that she was about to sing and to end off her set, Tricia sang a metal tune by Townsend called Vampire, and pulled it off neatly.

Brittany Kwasnik was next up, and it was a treat for me and several in the crowd who have seen her with her full band in recent shows, and to hear her acoustic side. She acknowledged that fact by mentioning a slight intimidation not having the band behind her. Brittany sang 4 of her 7 songs from the Covers and the Sheets, her newest CD. Her final song, Give it a Rest, caught my attention, which had an easygoing style with Brittany tapping on her guitar to add a certain light drum feel to this song.

Closing out the show was Stefanie Parnell giving the crowd her blend of folk and soft rock and supported ably by violinist Marine Buton and guitarist Connor Seidel, who also played a mean banjo on a song called The River. She was also joined on a song by David Hodges which featured a rap section but keeping in mind the folkish theme. Stefanie, who’s been played at high profile events such as the Montreal Folk Festival, has recently released her first CD called, The Road to You.

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