Photo cred - Paul Eifert

You may have tried your best to repress the dark memories of winter 2013-14, the season being particularly cold and awful, even by Montreal standards, but it looks like history is going to repeat itself. According to the Weather Network's head meteorologist Chris Scott, this year's winter will be near-identical to last year's, reports the Globe and Mail, or in basic terms, the next few months are gonna be soul-crushingly cold and snowy.

The reason for the meteorological repeat/Scott's prediction can be rooted back to the water temperatures of the Pacific Ocean, which is one of the main influences on the Earth's atmosphere. Right now, parts of the Pacific Ocean (South America-central Pacific) are a tad warmer than normal, a warm phase known as El Nino.

Scott describes this year's El Nino as "weak," just like last year, which creates harsh winters. So, thanks to this meteorological process, we can look forward to "below-average temperatures and near-normal precipitation" in Quebec. At least now we have something to blame, even if its just a natural weather process.

A small respite is the fact that, at least according to Scott, we won't be locked into last year's awful weather until January and February. December is slated to be a 4 year old hopped up on sugar type of month, with large leaps between highs and lows in temperatures.

In terms of this year's snowfall-rate, Scott gave a classic meteorologist/politician's response, stating that precipitation could be lower than last year, if storms concentrate over the U.S., or the opposite could be true. To quote Scott: “We can either get a lot of snow in Ontario and Quebec, or we can get a meagre snowfall." Or in other words: I have no clue and lets see what happens.

So sophisticated weather-tracking and the analysis of atmospheric processes pretty much told us this: winter will be cold. Thank Odin we cleared that one up.


Are you looking for more? Click here for 10 Things Montrealers Fear Most About Winter In The City >

For more on all things Montreal, follow Michael on Twitter @MDAlimonte

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