Canada's Royal Canadian Mint has been making coins for a long time, but even newer coins can be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars due to errors or interesting little quirks that make a coin rare and therefore valuable.

Here at MTLBlog, we love to see our readers become overnight thousand-aires, which is why we're here to provide you with the info you need to seek out these valuable coins. 

Some of the coins below can get you up to $50,000 at auction, but even less valuable coins are worth knowing about so you don't accidentally lose a hundred dollar quarter!

READ ALSO: Your Old Canadian Nickels May Now Be Worth $10,000

TL;DR Here are 14 types of Canadian quarters that are worth a lot more than 25 cents. While some are only worth a couple hundred bucks, there are several that can get your thousands or tens of thousands of dollars, if you know what to look for!

All the values in this article are courtesy of MyRoadToWealthAndFreedom.com, and quoted information can be found here. If you think you have a coin that is worth something, head to this website here.


2000 P Caribou Quarter

When the Mint started to experiment with nickel-plating steel coins they printed a little P on the obverse side of these quarters. Not many were released into circulation making them super rare and worth as much as $10,000.

More info here.


2000 Millennium Map Mule & 2007 Wheelchair Curling Mule

These coins weren't found in circulation but were actually found in Royal Canadian Mint proof-like sets and a majority of the coins with the error were destroyed by the Mint. With fewer than 100 in existence, you'd be lucky to find one and could likely get "around $500 or more for it."

More info here.


1992 Rotated Die Error Quarter

In 1992, the Royal Canadian Mint released a commemorative coin for each province. The coins aren't rare for this reason, but there were some that were made with "a type of minting error called a 'rotated die'." Essentially, when you turn the coin over, you can see the portrait is rotated 90 or 180 degrees. The New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, and Northwest Territories coins are the three most rare. They generally sell for between $150 and $300, though the Saskatchewan coin has yet to be sold at auction, so who knows how much it could really be worth. 

More info here.


1973 Large Bust Mountie Quarter

Made to commemorate the 100th birthday of the RCMP, the Mint created hundreds of millions of quarters depicting a Mountie on horseback. But some of them were made with the "obverse of the 1972 Quarter," making them rare. Circulated copies can get you $150, while mint condition examples are worth between $300 and $500. 

More info here.


1967 Bobcat Nickel Pattern Quarter

The Mint created around 50 million of these silver quarters, making them quite common, but a rumoured 5-10 of them were struck in nickel, making them rare. You'd have to take the coin in somewhere to know for sure if it's nickel or silver, but if it is nickel you could get yourself somewhere between $3,000 and $5,000 at auction. 

More info here.


1951 Low Relief George VI Quarter

The Royal Canadian Mint created two types of quarters in 1951 and the "low relief" ones are particularly rare. To tell the difference between the low and high relief: on the low relief coin the first "A" in DEI GRATIA points between two rim denticles, whereas the high relief points directly to a denticle. According to MRTWAF.com, these low relief versions can pull in "several hundreds, if not thousands of dollars!"

More info here.


1947 Dot George VI Quarter

This dot coin was created to remove the "Emperor of India" inscription after India gained independence in 1948. Originally the dot was actually a little maple leaf, to signify the year they were made, but over time the die deteriorated, turning the leaf into a dot. Low-end, this coin will get you $100 or less, but in a mint condition this coin could get you somewhere between $1,500 and $3,500.

More info here.


1936 Dot George V Quarter

Apparently, these coins were made in the midst of Edward VIII abdicating the throne, so they made these to "buy time" until the effigy of George VI was ready. The dot means that the coin was made in 1937 and low-end grade examples can be found for $100, while better condition coins can sell for around $5,000.

More info here.


1921 George V Quarter

These silver coins are "highly sought after" amongst collectors and fetch a wide range of prices depending on the condition. Low-end coins may get you less than $50, while coins in a better state can fetch "thousands, or in some cases, tens of thousands" of dollars. 

More info here.


1915 George V Quarter

Apparently, very few of these coins have survived to today, and even those that have are usually not in very good condition. Those in mint-state have pulled anywhere from $5,000 to $14,000 at auction. Other, mid-grade circulations can fetch anywhere from $250 to $900. 

More info here.


1906 Small Crown Edward VII Quarter

Considered the "rarest of rare Canadian Quarters," with perhaps only 100 coins made before the mint realized their error. The crown at the top of the coin on the reverse side is smaller than intended. According to MRTWAF.com, very few of these coins still exist today, but they have been sold at auction for $50,000 when in good condition. Low-grade conditions will pull in around $1,000.

More info here.


1893 Queen Victoria Quarter

This rare coin will get you some cash in any condition, but the better the condition the better the price, of course. Low-grade condition coins can fetch you "a few hundred" dollars, where a better condition will likely bring in "a few thousand."

More info here.


1889 Queen Victoria Quarter

Low grades of this rare coin with get you a "couple hundred bucks," but even if they are in "mid-grade" condition you can still get $1,000 for one of these bad boys. Mint condition means you're looking at prices in the "tens of thousands" of dollars.

More info here.


1875 H Queen Victoria Quarter

Worth tens of thousands in a mint state, this coin can get you between $500 and $1,000 even in "low grade" states. This coin is often called the "Queen of Canadian Quarters," and is the rarest Victoria Quarter according to MRTWAF.com.

More info here.


As mentioned above, all the information in this article is courtesy of MyRoadToWealthAndFreedom.com and has been quoted accordingly. 

If you are looking to have coins appraised, let me tell you right now, the fine crew at MTLBlog does not do appraisals. Head to CDNcoin.com instead to find answers to your coin-related inquiries. 

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