Uber Eats just made it easier to find and order from black-owned restaurants in Montreal. "For a limited time," the popular food delivery app has eliminated delivery fees for orders from local black-owned eateries. According to a report from Reuters, this promotion will last through 2020 across Canada.

Uber Eats users can find black-owned restaurants in their area by tapping on the banner at the top of the app main page.

"You asked for an easy way to order from Black-owned restaurants — we listened," the page reads.

"Browse local restaurants below and show your support by placing an order with no delivery fee." Though "other fees" may apply.

MTL Blog has reached out to Uber Eats for more details. We'll update this article when we receive a response.

Among the restaurants Montrealers will find on the page are the ever-popular Lloydie's, Boom J's Cuisine, Tropical Paradise, and Caribbean Food Factory.

The Reuters report indicates that the lists of black-owned restaurants took shape using "publicly available sources and with input from local organizations and business associations."

Restaurants can "can opt out of the program" if they choose.

Activists have directed people to buy from their local minority-owned businesses as just one way to support the black communities in their cities.

Those calls have been amplified by the protests against racism and police brutality that have erupted across North America.

Hoodstock Coordinator Cassandra Exumé previously spoke with MTL Blog about other ways Montrealers can be actively anti-racist and support the black community.

She encourages everyone to "speak out against racist acts, words, jokes, and behaviour loudly and clearly at the time these actions take place."

For allies, that work starts by evaluating their own perspectives.

"Break the psychological bias caused by racism by questioning yourself," she said.

She made clear that listening without rebuttals "to the experiences of Black people as they tell you about their difficulties in accessing housing and careers and their experiences with police brutality" is also critical.

"It's not the time for dialogue, it's time to listen."

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