WARNING: This article includes spoilers for the most recent episode of Game of Thrones, Season Eight, Episode Five (S08E05). If you haven't seen this most recent episode, you have been warned!!!


Game of Thrones has almost come to an end and a lot of fans are really sad to see the show go... particularly because of the way it's going.

Of course, you can't expect to get everything you want when your favourite show ends (if we did, Marissa never would have died in The O.C.) and to an extent, you have to assume the showrunners have had some method to their madness when creating a show.

So while a lot of people were confused with Daenerys' behaviour in last night's episode, the creators of the show actually had a pretty solid explanation for why the Daughter of the Mad King acted the way she did when they spoke with ET Online

The Game of Thrones showrunners D.B. Weiss and David Benioff, lovingly referred to as D&D by fans, spoke with ET Online yesterday to discuss why Daenerys went on the tirade she did in last night's episode. 

Most notably Benioff says that if circumstances had been different this vengeful side of Daenerys may have never come out. If the series of circumstances that occurred since the first season had gone differently, she may have not had to bring the full fire and blood side of her out.

The circumstances that Benioff is referring to go way back to season one. From watching her brother's head melt off to Cersei's betrayal, and the execution of Missandei - all of these things have added up to create the Dany we saw last night.

Benioff also mentioned Jon telling Daenerys the truth about his right to the throne as another moment that helped push Dany to the precipice. 

They are also sure to mention how alone Daenerys now. She is someone who has had quite strong alliances throughout the show, but if you stop to think about all of those people she's had in her life, it's evident how alone she is now.

If her allies didn't turn on her, they died, which is why Benioff notes it can be scary for a person in such a position of power to inevitably be that isolated. When she could have most used the guiding words of a close friend or lover, she has none.

D.B. Weiss chimed in to add that when Dany says, "Let it be fear," she's conceding that she must choose a path that "isn't pleasant" and inevitably wrought with violence. 

Source

Account Settings
Notifications
Favourites
Log Out