It's Official, Canada Ranked For "Worst Healthcare System" In The World

Its free BUT...

If you've lived in Montreal for more than a couple of minutes, you've either experienced or heard someone complain about our terrible healthcare system.

READ ALSO:  Quebec Ranked #1 In The "World" For Longest Hospital ER Wait Times

Now don't get me wrong, I'm still extremely lucky and grateful to live in a country where our healthcare is free and no politicians are trying to take it away. That being said, aside from the United States, every single other developed country in the world has a single payer system similar to Canada's. That means it's time to stop bragging about that one fact and start wondering why ours is so bad compared to other countries'.



Want to know exactly how bad? The CommonWealth Fund, which is a foundation dedicated to making healthcare more accessible to lower income portions of the population. They recently went through an extensive examination and concluded that we raked #9 out of 11 high-income countries. 



They evaluated 11 countries and these are there rankings:

1) United Kingdom

2) Australia

3) Netherlands

4) New Zealand and Norway (tied)

6) Sweden and Switzerland (tied)

8) Germany

9) Canada

10) France

11) United States


They based these ratings from five different categories when conducting their study:

Care Process (Our rank: 6)

Care process is basically how well and at what standard you're being treated and is an important measure of not only how well a healthcare system works as a whole, but also how well trained the doctors and staff are.

Access: (Our rank: 10)

Access covers two sections: Affordability and Timeliness. With the wait times that we have, it is no surprise that we finished near the bottom in this category.

Administratve Efficiency: (Our rank: 6)

The administrative aspect measures how available to see patients doctors are and how efficient the rest of the staff is with regards to dealing with paperwork and proper documentation.

Equity: (Our rank: 9)

Equity measures the difference between the health levels of higher-income and lower-income individuals. The lower the difference, the higher the level of equity.

Healthcare Outcomes: (Our rank: 9)

Healthcare Outcomes measure straight up the percentage of people that are properly treated and that are kept alive with timely and systematic healthcare resources.


While you may take comfort in knowing that the neighbours to the south are dead last by a long shot, it's high time we turned to our politicians and demand that we make our healthcare systems something worth bragging about once again.

For more data as well as the entire study, their findings, and their conclusions, check out the Fund's article right here

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Elias Grigoriadis Will write 4 nugz