Knowing where a crime will happen is next to impossible (until we have Minority Report-style precogs, that is) but that isn't to say we can't predict where crimes are most likely to occur.

Simply by analyzing where and when crimes have already been perpetrated, we can get a pretty good estimate of "problem" areas, geographic locations with high crime-rates that will likely experience more unlawful acts than others.

Using open portal data supplied by the City of Montreal and SPVM, CBC/Radio-Canada have done exactly that, mapping out where break-ins occur across the city.

In the police force's released dataset, 10,860 breaking-and-entering crimes were documented in 2015 and 2016 (only January to March). The maps below showcase this information, with data only centered on the City of Montreal, and not other on-island municipalities.

As one can see on the map, certain boroughs were demonstrated to have experienced more break-ins than others. Specific intersections (addresses were withheld to protect the identities of victims) were also shown to be more prone to break-ins, with the two most problematic being Édouard-Montpetit Boulevard/McKenna Street and De Gaspé Street.

You can also expect more maps like this when the city unveils more information on crime in Montreal, with information regarding robberies, traffic collisions, car thefts, and more to be released this summer.

Check out the map of Montreal break-ins below, with  both CBC's heat map and Radio-Canada's "by the numbers" map included.  For a larger version head to the CBC link or Radio-Canada map here.

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