In 2016, a Black Mirror-type techno-thriller film called Nerve was released. It follows the life of a misunderstood teen who gets quickly wrapped up in a mysterious mobile game all the "cool kids" are playing.  In this game, players are anonymously sent "dares" via mobile and they quickly become increasingly dangerous and eventually life-threatening.

READ ALSOWhat Is The "Momo Challenge" And Why Is Everyone Talking About It

Watching this movie back in 2016 it was pure fiction; hard to believe that anything like this could ever happen in the real world. I had so many questions: Would young people ever succumb to these types of online games?  And also, what motivates people to even create such a potentially dangerous and life-threatening game?

Looks like this 2016 film may have predicted the future, as you've probably already heard about the "Momo Challenge" circulating the internet.

It's difficult to believe that this "scam" could actually be real. It appears to be more of a digital urban legend or online farce; somewhere someone is hiding behind a screen chuckling and twiddling their fingers in delight because everyone's falling for this colossal joke.

This would indeed be a cruel joke as the details of this online "game" is terrifying and far from comical.

The challenge reportedly started on Facebook where people were told to chat with a stranger via an unknown number on Whatsapp. The user is then challenged to complete a series of dangerous and potentially life-threatening tasks in hopes of meeting "Momo."

"Momo" is represented by an image of a woman with grotesque horror movie features and bulging eyes taken from the work of Japanese artist Midori Hayashi, who is not associated with the game in any way.

The Sun has confirmed that a 12-year-old girl died in Argentina after reportedly playing the game via WhatsApp.

Reports also claim that the Momo Challenge has been seen in Mexico, Argentina, United States, France, and Germany.

According to a source, The Momo challenge has arrived in Montreal. Young victims are led to believe that they possess sensitive information about them. Then they invite young people to contact them; threatening to reveal sensitive info if they do not meet certain challenges.

The Le Service de police de l’agglomération de Longueuil urges that if anyone receives a Whatsapp based message of this nature that they do not respond. Instead, take a screenshot and immediately report this scam to officials.

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