The legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada is only days away.

As the October 17th deadline looms, a whole new industry, public bureaucracy, and legal code are prepared to suddenly come into force.

ALSO READ: Canada Has New Driving Laws For Transporting Weed

TL;DR The personal information of Canadian investors in the cannabis industry is public information. American officials could use this list to issue lifetime entry bans to those individuals.

Cannabis legalization has had diplomatic implications, too.

This issue has further strained the already tense relationship between Canada and the United States.

Once the closest of allies, the two countries have drifted dramatically in recent years as the U.S. regresses toward autocracy and Canada continues to demonstrate its commitment to progressive social policy.

Marijuana legalization has most strikingly called attention to that divergence.

Because the drug is still federally illegal in the U.S. (despite its legalization in some states), American officials have vowed to make no legal exceptions for Canadian consumers of cannabis.

The United States Customs and Border Protection agency, for example, has warned that Canadians with any legal association with the drug, whether as an investor or casual smoker, will receive lifetime bans from entering the United States.

But while it is nearly impossible for American authorities to track Canadian individual marijuana consumers (border agents can only ask about drug use if they see or smell evidence), unfortunately for thousands of Canadians, the identities of investors in cannabis-related ventures are public information.

The Canadian Securities Exchange (CSE) is, according to The Globe and Mail, the most popular marketplace for such companies. 

The CSE also adheres to a strict standard of transparency.

That means that the full names and addresses of almost two thousand Canadian investors in the cannabis industry are easily accessible on the CSE website.

Through the CSE Cannabis Stock List, website visitors can view every applicable Canadian company.

Then, through links adjacent to every company name, any member of the public can view individual company documents.

One need only scroll down to "CSE Filings" and open Form 9 documents, the report through which these companies disclose their list of investors.

An exhaustive examination of each company's 2018 Form 9 documents revealed that the personal information of at least 1,972 Canadian investors in cannabis companies is vulnerable.

This information, of course, is completely accessible to American officials as well as the general public.

If U.S. customs and border authorities are serious about their threat to issue lifetime bans to every Canadian with associations to marijuana, they could easily make use of this list.

While it is unlikely that U.S. officials have already banned all of these individuals, their travel privileges are certainly at risk and open to American scrutiny.

Moreover, 1,972 is merely the number of individuals on the list of investors with confirmed residence in Canada according to Form 9. 

There are hundreds more named cannabis investors for whom the CSE does not disclose personal addresses. They, too, could be vulnerable.

Then, of course, there are countless more Canadians with associations to the cannabis industry, including small business owners with public liscenses to sell recreational marijuana as well as employees in government-run cannabis agencies (like the société québécoise du cannabis), who may also receive lifetime bans.

Again, while it is unlikely that all of these individuals have received such prohibitions, they are certainly the kind of targets American officials have already described.


 

Account Settings
Notifications
Favourites
Share Feedback
Log Out

Register this device to receive push notifications