Finding a nice apartment in a big city is a feat in itself. Back in 1972, Japanese architectural firm 'Metabolism' thought the solution, at least in Japan, was to create more apartments using a lot less space. Thus, the Nakagin Capsule Tower was constructed in 1972, an apartment tower holding over 140 different apartments, each about 100 square feet in size. Less became much more in terms of Japanese living spaces.

Thirty years later and micro-apartments are still with us. To capture the unique atmosphere of micro-apartments, photographer Noritaka Minami created the photo series '1972.'Minami's photos are work both as an ode to Nakagin tower and also contrast the drastic changes which have occured in Japanese society from tower's construction in 1972 and now.

About half of the apartments are now used as offices, with the other half housing an eclectic mix of residents. Minami's stylistic photography makes the micro-apartments look very sleek, comfortable, and even very livable. Seeing it in person is a much different experience I'm sure. Be glad Montreal just stuck with Habitat 67, and isn't cramming folks into micro-apartments.

Take a look inside Nakagin Capsule Tower via Minami's photos below.

Source - Fast CoExist

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