The "fall back" means that, suddenly, our precious few final hours of daylight have been reduced in the evening. In a winter season that's set to be more isolating than ever, that loss at the end of the day is calling attention to the additional stress possibly brought on by daylight saving in Quebec.

That consideration doesn't seem to be lost on Premier François Legault, who said in response to a journalist's question at a press conference Monday that his government is "looking at the different scenarios" when it comes to the twice-yearly time change.

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So far, we don't expect to change.

Premier François Legault

Though he made clear that "so far" there are no changes in store.

The premier previously said he was "open" to the idea of not turning back the clocks.

Similar movements to stay on daylight saving time have sprung up in Ontario and New York, two of Quebec's neighbours.

Legault's comment came during a broader conversation about the population's mental health and the state of mental health services in the province.

He also admitted that there's a "worry" about the increase in mental health problems due to the pandemic.

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