After an exhausting 10-day search, animal rescuer Geneviève Duperron says Roxy, a Labrador-German shepherd cross, has been found safe. Ge cherche Charly, an animal rescue service headed by Duperron, said the dog was found on a small island in the Chaudière River between the community of Saint-Rédempteur and Highway 73 on Thursday. But this was no ordinary pup. Roxy belongs to Amélie Lemieux, mother of 11-year-old Norah and six-year-old Romy Carpentier, who were found dead on July 11 near the community of Saint-Apollinaire after an Amber Alert.

Police said they were killed by their father Martin Carpentier, who took his own life.

According to a post to the Ge cherche Charly Facebook page, Roxy escaped on the day of the girls' funeral.

"When I saw the announcement of a lost dog on Monday of last week, I went to read the comments of the publication and it was by reading these that I realized that another misfortune was coming to arrive for this family (which already had their share)," reads a statement on Ge cherche Charly's Facebook page.

That same Monday, Pierre-Olivier, one of Lemieux's brothers contacted Ge cherche Charly, which immediately offered to help, reads the statement.

"I met a man determined to bring the dog back to his sister at all costs," it continues.

A number of volunteers from the community of Charny and the surrounding area stepped up to help in the search. "Honestly, I have never had such an effective team."

After days of searching, a resident of Saint-Rédempteur spotted Roxy on the island on Wednesday.

Heavy rainfall over the last few days had raised the water level, trapping the dog, reads the statement.

Rescuers feared the worst after receiving reports that Roxy had been hit by a car on Wednesday morning but the dog appears to be doing quite well, it continued.

The only visible evidence of her ordeal is a missing patch of fur on her right hip, it said, though more will be known after a veterinary appointment today.

Rescuers set up a cage trap and hunting cameras on the island and Roxy was caught at around 1:40 a.m. Thursday, though rescuers had to wait a few hours before wading through knee-high water to fetch her, equipped with life jackets and straps.

"I have no words this morning," reads the statement. "The emotion is so strong!"

Losing a dog can be overwhelming at the best of circumstances as it means hanging lost-pet posters around the area in the hopes that someone will get in touch, physically searching for the pet and doing a lot of worrying.  

"However, you know as well as I do that these people were already going through enough stress without having had time to take rest," reads the statement.  

Speaking to MTL Blog, Duperron said "the Roxy case was just as important as any other." And that it was "a relief to have accomplished a duty and to have been able to save a dog and bring her back to her family."  

"But I would never have made it without the confidence and dedication of a great team of volunteers," she added.  

Duperron said she started her Drummondville-based rescue service after her dog Charly, a golden retriever, went missing for 58 days.  

After that, she discovered a talent for dog rescuing, which is not as simple a process as one might think, she said.  

A lost dog can go into "survival mode" she said, where it will behave more like a feral animal than a domesticated pet.  

In survival mode, a dog will become suspicious of humans and will revert to its primal instincts in a quest to satisfy the basic needs of food, water, safety and shelter, according to resources provided by Duperron.  

That's why searching for a dog in survival mode must be done skillfully in order to avoid frightening the animal and seeing it flee from those trying to rescue it, she said.

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