Quebec's 2021 Spring Forecast Is Out

We've finally (somehow??) made it through the bulk of winter and Quebec's 2021 spring forecast is promising an early reward for our perseverance through this dreadful season.

The Weather Network released its spring predictions for Canada on Monday and Quebecers should be happy... at least for a little while.

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What will spring be like in Quebec?

Most excitingly, the site says the month of March could "bring extended tastes of early spring" to Ontario and Quebec

It also predicts "near normal" temperatures for the season overall.

But Montrealers shouldn't expect to whip out their bathing suits and head to Verdun Beach too soon.

The Weather Network warns of "parting shots of winter" and "a period of colder weather" mid-season "before more consistent warmth sets in."

Both provinces could also see "above normal rainfall," though, according to the forecast, there shouldn't be more rainy days than usual.

In better news, "the risk for widespread flooding is lower than normal this spring."

"The deep freeze is behind us, but the threat of wintry weather is not over," Chris Scott, Chief Meteorologist with The Weather Network, said in a statement.

"A milder March will be a delightful contrast to the frigid February experienced by many Canadians, but spring will sputter at times."

What about the other provinces?

Looks like this year the Atlantic provinces are getting a monopoly on fantastic spring weather — and if their travel restrictions continue, they'll be keeping it to themselves.

The Weather Network predicts that "above normal temperatures will continue to dominate for most of spring" in the east, despite "the typical risk for high impact late winter storms."

In the prairie provinces, meanwhile, the site suggests a pattern similar to that in Ontario and Quebec could be in store, with a particularly spring-like March and later returns to colder weather.

Alarmingly, The Weather Network meteorologists express concern that "drought conditions south of the border could become more widespread and impact southern parts of the region by the start of the growing season."

Across the Rockies, British Columbia could see "a slower than typical start to the season [...] with cooler than seasonal temperatures."